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Casey Barrio Minton


Jillian Blueford

Jillian Blueford, PhD candidate in the Counselor Education program, was selected as a 2018-19 Counselor Education and Supervision (CE&S) Editorial Fellow.

 

“I sought out this role because I see a benefit of engagement and networking. I recognize that the Counselor Education field is comprised of individuals in a variety of academic settings participating in several capacities who are enhancing our communities and how we educate future professional counselors. I wanted to step out of my comfort zone and interact in this broader community and learn all that I can from others.”

Blueford first heard of this opportunity when Everett Painter (’17) was accepted as a fellow last year. As part of the application process, she had to choose potential mentors and explain why she wanted to work with them. To accomplish this task, she worked with Casey Barrio Minton, professor, who is currently on the CE&S Editorial Board to learn about the other board members and who she would best align with. She was paired with with Daniel Gutierrez, assistant professor at William and Mary. Blueford said, “he has research interests in strength-based interventions and the influences of spirituality on mental health and wellness. He is also an alum of the University of Central Florida like I am, so I look forward to working with a fellow Knight. ”

The idea of working on the other side of the publication process and improving her skills as a writer and future reviewer appealed to Blueford. She will attend orientation the last week of June and then officially begin reviewing journal submissions with her mentor.


Justin is a master’s student in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program and co-chaired the position with Kevin last fall. Kevin (’16) is an alumni of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program and became the service chair in 2015. With the guidance and support of current and past faculty advisors (Casey Barrio Minton and Shawn Spurgeon, respectively), they helped create and grow relationships Upsilon Theta built with the Knoxville Reanimation Coalition and Katherine Ambroziak (associate professor from the College of Architecture and Design), who heads the project at the Odd Fellows Cemetery.

Kevin said, “I was sincerely elated and surprised, not because I didn’t think our project was worthy of recognition, but because I had not done anything like this before. Although recognition is not necessary, it can help keep momentum going for an organization. It can stimulate even bigger and better ideas and growth. I hope the award motivates others who join CSI to think about not only what they can do but also what is possible. I am also excited for what this means for the Knoxville Reanimation Coalition, the group whose mission it is to maintain, revitalize, and enhance the East Knoxville community. I think they are doing some of the most important work in Knoxville. They don’t do it for recognition; they engage in hard work to improve the neighborhood that is home to them.”

Justin expressed, “I am truly honored to be receiving this award and to see how Kevin and Katherine Ambroziak’s hard work has paid off. If there is anything I would like to add to this piece, it would be how important service and advocacy (the driving force of service) are to the counseling profession. If we truly want to serve our clients whether we are in schools or in mental health settings, we need to be active and intentional members of our community, and I think service events through Chi Sigma Iota are excellent way to begin that meaningful process of engagement.”

Kevin explained the application process:

Every fall, CSI opens applications for chapter awards and student nominations for national positions. Casey Barrio Minton (associate professor), our current chapter advisor and long-time member of CSI, encouraged us to apply for the chapter award. I agreed with her that I thought it was a good idea, and I was happy to help. I honestly did not think we would have a chance because I thought the relationship was too new. However, since CSI-UT’s participation in the the Odd Fellows Cemetery project, our student engagement in service activities improved tremendously – in part because of the uniqueness of the project itself, in part from some new enthusiasm coming from the student board, and in part because I think there are some emerging ideas coming from the counseling community regarding social justice and community-level work that individual “therapy” simply does not address. Service and building community relationships are critical aspects of my life that I love and want to share with others, and I tried to provide that opportunity for anyone who was interested while I was service chair. So, naturally, I think others picked up on that.

Justin Hawkersmith and myself worked on the application proposal with Casey Barrio Minton and Katherine Ambroziak to submit letters of recommendation for the project. We spoke on not only what it meant to engage CSI counseling members in a project that was off campus and in a predominantly black community but also on the importance and meaning of the project itself. The cemetery represents an important part of black history and black heritage in Knoxville, and its current dilapidated state is worth the reflection and attention of the greater Knoxville community. Counselors, who more often than not are white and middle class, will go on to work with individuals from a variety of communities different than their own, but may not have an in-depth understanding of those communities and the issues within them. Given the current climate of our society, it is integral more than ever that organizations and university groups build and foster relationships and work on real problems.

Barrio Minton really helped make the process easy. Writing the application was the easy part, because the project meant a lot to me and Justin and I hoped to really see it continue even after I graduated from the program. Barrio Minton really helped pull it together, helped us stay organized, and made sure we had what we needed to submit a quality proposal.

Upsilon Theta was recognized and awarded during a ceremony held at the ACA Annual Conference and Expo in San Francisco, CA from March 16-19, 2017.

For more information about this project, check out the following Counselor Education blog stories:
CSI-UT Sponsors Service Event at Odd Fellows Cemetery
CSI-UT Returns to Odd Fellows Cemetery to Continue Service
CSI-UT Sponsors Service Event at Odd Fellows Cemetery


Isabel C. Farrell places first for her poster presentationFarrell was encouraged to apply by Counselor Education alumna Amanda DeDiego (’16). She said, “I almost didn’t apply to the colloquium because my topic is focused on counselor education programs, so I thought most people wouldn’t understand the implications. However, I was surprised to see that many people outside of the program related to the topic and understood the importance.”

Isabel C. Farrell “I felt extremely honored and surprised! I read the email about 10 times to make sure I was reading it right. There were so many talented scholars there, and I am honored that my research was chosen.”

Her poster was titled “Counselor, Instructor, Supervisor, Classmate: Managing Multiple Relationships in Doctoral Programs.” The presentation reported the preliminary results of a qualitative, grounded theory study that investigated how doctoral students remained genuine and connected while navigating multiple relationships and boundary crossings and implications for counselor educators. This research is being conducted along with Casey Barrio Minton, associate professor.

Farrell thanked Casey Barrio Minton, associate professor, for all her support and guidance and Lauren Moret, assistant professor, for inspiring her to do this type research. She said, “I think we (in this college) are so lucky to have such amazing and supportive faculty. Also, to all students, your research is important and valuable! I keep learning that through the course of this degree.”


The Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling was honored to have other participants present at the 13th Annual Graduate Student Research Colloquium.

Lezli Anderson | School Psychology
– poster presentation
“Critical Thinking: A Predictor of School-Bases Academic and Social Success”

Emily Gray | Adult Learning
– oral presentation
“Student and Instructor Experiences with Types of Teaching and Learning in a Computer Course”

Jessica Osborne | Evaluation, Statistics & Measurement
– poster presentation
“Assessing Impact: Measuring Student Perceptions of Development Through Participation in Academic Support Programs”

Victoria VanMaaren | School Psychology
– poster presentations
“Reducing Hallway Disruptions through Group Contingencies and Explicit Timing: A Variation of the Timely Transitions Game”
“The Effect of Anonymous Versus Confidential Extra Credit Contingencies on Course Evaluation Submission Rates”

Laura S. Wheat | Assistant Professor
– faculty spotlight


Casey Barrio-Minton

“I serve the organizations I serve because I believe our collective work facilitates a context in which professional counselors can develop their skills and serve their communities. On one hand, the recognition feels deeply meaningful and affirming because it reflects back an important part of my identity. On the other, it feels somewhat incongruent; I serve because I believe we have a collective responsibility to our profession and our community, not for individual recognition or reward.”

Barrio Minton was nominated for this award by the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling (AARC), a division of ACA for which she has served as president. She will be recognized and awarded during a ceremony held at the ACA Annual Conference and Expo in San Francisco, CA from March 16-19, 2017.

Educational Psychology & Counseling Department
College of Education, Health & Human Sciences

535 Bailey Education Complex
1122 Volunteer Boulevard
Knoxville, TN 37996-3452
Phone: 865-974-8145 Fax: 865-974-0135